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Tag Archives: books about wine

Cookbook of the day – Wine

Christian Callec

Wine: A Comprehensive Look at the World’s Best Wines

by Christian Callec

  • Publisher  (October 7, 2003)
  • ISBN 10: 0517221659
  • ISBN 13: 978-0517221655
  • This book is one of those books that was designed from the outset to be marketed as a “remainder”, those less expensive books that you find on the budget tables of bookstores. It’s a handy source of wine information, but its great virtue, and the reason that I’m specifically recommending it this morning,  is the copious amount of photos of actual bottles that illustrate the various winemaking regions. Using top producers as visual examples, you’ll get a look at the labels of many great  producers and the bottles that hold their product.  There are plenty of labels in lieu of bottles as well as the usual panoply of vineyard and “behind the scenes” shots.

    Visually, this is real blessing for any dedicated wine enthusiast and is worth digging around for. As of this posting, Amazon.com has about 15 copies in both new and used condition, and they range in price from .99 to $21.95.

    If you want a visual tour of the great bottles of the world, this is your round-trip ticket.

    Cookbook of the day – The World Atlas of Wine

    wine_atlas

    The World Atlas of Wine

    by Hugh Johnson and Jancis Robinson

    Publisher –Mitchell Beazley

    ISBN-10: 1840003324

    ISBN-13: 978-1840003321

    A confession – I’m a sucker for a topographic map. Perhaps this is a remnant of my backpacking days or my time in the military.

    So I’m a sucker for this book, especially since I love wine as well.

    Johnson and Robinson are leading wine writers and so, they are perfect for fleshing out the details behind the maps.

    And these maps! Some are detailed non-topographic but coded for vineyards, forests, etc.  Some have terrain features like hills and mountains airbrushed in. And some offer the detail of a USGS topographic map. Regardless of what type of map they use, there’s detail down to some of the smallest settlements and clearly defined vineyard areas.

    You also get detail soil analysis as well as climatic issues that impact the region. You get details on plantings and there are copious photographs that flesh out the life behind the bottle.

    This book should be part of any reasonable wine library, as it’s a valuable research tool.

    Johnson and Robinson