So You Want To Be A Waiter

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Tag Archives: Charlie Rose

New York Chef/Restaurateur David Bouley on Charlie Rose

An interesting conversation with David Bouley.

On his time learning about Japanese cooking – “We made dashi for three days”.

There are some interesting things said about the importance of nutrition and the use of artisan ingredients.

Definitely worth a view.

I presume that this will show up on Rose’s website shortly.

I’m still here!

Yes, dear reader, I’m still around…

You see, at the moment I’m stuck without an actual internet account.  I’ve got this way cool new Droid X which is a lot easier to type on than the ole Eris, which was a perfectly fine phone but a little too small to type on. This is better but it’s still a bit of a chore to type a substantial post on it.

But I thought I should at least check in to my loyal readers.

For a little real content, I thought that I’d mention that Charlie Rose did a food oriented show tonight (4.14.2011), interviewing Gabrielle Hamilton, the owner of Prune, the acclaimed NY restaurant, who has written a memoir, Jonathan Waxman, chef/owner of Italian restaurant Barbuto, and one of the most inspired chefs in the world at the moment, Spanish chef Ferran Adria.

It’s a show worth checking out on his site in the next couple of days.  Rose is someone who relishes gastronomy and believes in the power of communal dining. I suspect that he wishes he could have spent time at table with Dorothy Parker in her prime.

Anyway, this modest post has taken almost 20 minutes to thumb out on the virtual keyboard (I don’t text so I’m not one of those speedy thumbers) so I think I’ll call it a night.

I’ll be back soon. Indeed I will…

Update on May 13th (Friday the 13th)…apparently this post never made it out of the draft status. Hence another downside of trying to update this sort of blog on a mobile device, no matter how hand it is. I”m at a real keyboard right now on an actual internet account and as I check the blog, I find that the original update never made it to blog.  How embarassing.

I still haven’t picked up a broadband account for my home yet, so it will still be a while before I get back to posting regularly. So I suppose I should exhort you to check your uniform, continue to evaluate your strengths and weaknesses and contine to dive into the archives.

In the meantime, hang in there waiting tables. May the fork be with you.

“A passion for hospitality”

This is a phrase that Frank Bruni, recently departed New York Times food critic, used last night on Charlie Rose to describe one of the main keys to a successful restaurant. If you missed it, it should show up on Charlie Rose’s website shortly (it’s not there yet).

http://www.charlierose.com/

It’s a very informative segment for anyone interested in food or restaurant topics.

This phrase is especially important for any waiter, regardless of type of restaurant that they might work in, to try to achieve because it’s the waiter who’s the point person for the hospitality experience.

Whan a waiter treats the diner as a guest instead of the customer, he or she is leaps and bounds ahead of the hospitality game. A warm and welcoming attitude can also help mitigate any problems with the food or the service itself.

So, step one in achieving this sort of “hospitality mentality” is to stop thinking of your diners as “customers”. Start referring to them as guests. Step two is to make a sincere attempt to interact with your guests in a warm and welcoming manner, even if they seem to be not responding in kind. Step three is to know your product, the logistics of your restaurant, and your own limitations. And the final step is to follow through with this attitude until the time that they leave the table. Try not to mentally “check out” when you drop the check. Your job isn’t done until they walk out the front door, and you’ve done your job if they leave with a wholly satisfactory feeling.

You do yourself and your restaurant a great service if you apply these easy techniques. Your restaurant will get the reputation of a comfortable and reliable place to dine in and your tips will increase.

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Image courtesy of http://www.wrenonline.com/

Chefs on Charlie Rose last night

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Charlie Rose is on vacation right now, so his shows are compilations of shows done earlier in the year, grouped by common topics.

Last night, he ran clips from his interviews with David Chang, Ferran Adria and José Andrés (with Andrés serving as interpreter), and Tom Collichio (learn how to pronounce his name, Charlie!).

All of the interviews were illuminating (I didn’t know that David Chang was basically a competitive golfer in his early days). I liked Adria comparing cooking to other art forms, noting that cooking involves all of the senses, whereas something like painting only involves one of them (sight). And I liked Collichio’s evolution as a chef actually being an evolution of reduction instead of increasing complexity.

You can view the entire show here for a little while:

http://www.charlierose.com/view/interview/10572

If it becomes unavailable as a whole show, you can likely view each segment separately in the archives by searching for each chef. The David Chang segment shown last night is excerpted from the full hour that Rose spent with him, so you might want to go directly to that segment, which you can find at the link of Serious Eats below the screenshot below.

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Screenshots courtesy of Serious Eats and can be found here:

http://www.seriouseats.com/2008/07/videos-david-chang-charlie-rose-pbs-momofuku-ko.html